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Forest Management in Indonesia

Forest Management in Indonesia


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Analysing REDD+ Challenges and Choices (2012)
30 May 2012
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This book aims to take stock of REDD+ experiences to date at the national level, as well as at the subnational and local levels where projects are implemented. In the process, the authors ask several questions: What is happening in national policy arenas and on the ground? How has REDD+ changed? What does it really look like? Where is REDD+ heading? Indonesia REDD+ Capacity Building Services Assessment (2012)
15 May 2012
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•       In the space of three years, capacity building and training efforts have transformed REDD+ from a little-known concept to one which is widely recognized, discussed and on the agenda of the Government of Indonesia. •       Alongside awareness raising at a national level, substantial progress has been made in capacity building for policy development and environmental safeguards, but key gaps remain. •       These gaps need to be filled; otherwise Indonesia may not be able to meet the objectives of its Draft National REDD+ strategy. Gaps include: § Insufficient attention paid to REDD+ awareness raising for actors’ based at a provincial level and especially the communities that live in and around the forests. § Minimal transfer of environmental safeguard knowledge built up in the NGO sector to the wider capacity building community. § A lack of REDD+ readiness capacity building support for natural resource industries provided among seven of the nine short-listed service providers consulted. This is a cause for concern given the dominant influence that the natural resource industry (e.g. oil palm development, mining and forestry) will have on the eventual success or failure of REDD+ in Indonesia. § A lack of service providers with experience in managing donor or private funds or trust fund structures. This gap is particularly worrying given that Indonesia has received the greatest amount of public and private REDD+ funding of any country to date. § Apart from government, there also appears to be a gap in the level of capacity building support for NGOs and community groups to manage REDD+ donor funds, and in the future, REDD+ carbon revenue. •       Recommendations for addressing these gaps are provided in Section 9 of this report. Forest Management Unit Development (FMU) - Concept, Legislation and Implementation (2011)
15 October 2011
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This book consists of 8 chapters that systematically endeavour to elaborate on aspects related to the definition and scope of FMU, as presented in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 presents an in-depth study on the rationale for FMU development that focuses on an overview of the state of forestry in Indonesia and its issues, in order to answer the question of why FMU development is important. Chapter 4 presents a review of the conceptual basis for FMU development policy and various regulations on FMU development, as well as detailed elaboration on the proper role of FMU in governance. Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 present expectations towards forest planning, forest management, and evaluation of forest management performance in the framework of FMU. For the final part of this book, social and governance aspects, and national resources for FMU development are presented in Chapter 7 and Chapter 8. Guidebook to Local Governments in Indonesia (DRAFT) (2011)
21 September 2011
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The first chapter briefly describes the general framework (history, levels, revenue, expenditure, legitimation and legislation of local governments). The general structures and key players are being outlined in the second chapter (local parliament (DPRD), heads of local governments, local government working units (SPKD), and internal structure of SKPD). The third chapter then gives an overview of selected procedures of external services (land titels and boundary demarcation, community empowerment, natural resources management) while the fourth chapter focuses on key internal procedures (planning-budgeting-reporting, human resources management and capacity building, salary and forms of employment). One special chapter “village government” briefly highlights the question of local governance on sub-district level (structures, planning and budgeting, traditional forms of governance). The last chapter then opens the room to give a more analytical account of underlying processes (relationship between national and local governments, political decision making in Indonesia, legal product hierarchy, etc.). The Political Economy of Policy-Making in Indonesia - Opportunities for Improving the Demand and Use of Knowlege (2011)
15 July 2011
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This paper not only tries to enhance the debate about policy-making in Indonesia but goes further in assessing the role that knowledge has played. Specifically, the aouthors aim to inform the Australian International Agency for International Development (AusAID)’s current effort to develop a programme in support of Indonesia’s knowledge sector. The objectives of the study are to: 1) describe formal policy processes in Indonesia; 2) uncover the realities or informal practices of policy processes and 3) assess the factors that motivate policy-makers to invest in, demand and/or use knowledge in policy-making. Despite the massive programme of decentralisation that took place at the turn of the century, the authors focus only on national level policy-making processes and do not assess policy-making at the district level, as this has been addressed by Sutmuller et al (2011). Additionally, the authors do not propose to assess impact or the level of influence of knowledge on policy and policy-making processes in Indonesia. Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) and Decentralized Forest Management (2009)
15 June 2009
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The implementation of a mechanism for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD - plus) will be affected by governance conditions within host countries. The top eight countries, which are responsible for 70 percent of the world’s total annual deforestation, have implemented certain forms of decentralization in public administration and forest management. This paper analyzes implications of decentralized forest management for the implementation of REDD. Three possible options for the involvement of local governments in the implementation of REDD are: 1) the central government decides on a national reference level and devolves the implementation to local governments; 2) the central government decides on a national reference level and seeks expressions of interest from local governments to implement REDD in their administrative areas; and 3) the central and local governments decide on a national reference level jointly and local governments implement REDD activities locally. This paper also highlights fiscal instruments for REDD revenue distribution. Forest Certification on Community Land in Indonesia (2008)
15 June 2008
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The study “Forest Certification on Community Lands in Indonesia” aims, for the first time, to understand the nature, processes and challenges faced by certified communities in Indonesia, and tries to draw lessons learned from this fledgling process. Work for the study was based on rapid literature analyses, discussions with experts and, in particular, a field visits to all certified areas, which are located in Central Java (Gunung Kidul, Sukoharjo and Wonogiri Districts) and Southeast Sulawesi (Konawe Selatan District) Forest Management Unit Establishment and Effort on Mitigation and Adaptation Towards Global Climate Change (2007)
15 July 2007
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The implementation of the FMU system is hoped to accelerate the achievement of SFM in production and protected forest area outside of Java. Supporting the FMU development efforts through allocation of development resources is connected to the ongoing efforts of reducing carbon emission from the forestry sector by increasing the carbon sequestration capacities of forests. Planting Trees, Growing Businesses - The Role of Micro, Small and Medium Sized Enterprises in The Revitalization of the Forestry Sector in Indonesia (2007)
26 June 2007
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The purpose of this policy brief is to review the impending regulations pertaining to community forestry that follow on from the forestry law PP06/2007 and consider how it may help or hinder the micro, small and medium sized enterprises (MSME) that operate in the forestry sector, throughout the value chain from forest to furniture. A consideration is made of the importance of the MSME sector in Indonesia, particularly its apparent role in alleviating poverty. By analyzing the current approach to ‘people’s plantations’ (HTR) and ‘community forests’ (HKm), recommendations are made for adjustments to the proposed regulations to improve the likelihood that community-based forest enterprises will thrive in the new paradigm of tenure reform. These aspects are considered in the light of certain external factors that may influence the forest reform process, in particular how the political economy of climate change and the post-Kyoto negotiations may place more emphasis on growing trees rather than fostering livelihoods. Furthermore, the role of private sector financial institutions, community-company partnerships and equity investors are reviewed to establish the most effective method of linking finance and expertise to forest communities. A number of specific recommendations are made to close the gap between the good intentions of the reform process and the difficulties in implementing it in a manner that empowers communities to set up and enjoy the benefits from sustainable forest enterprises. Debt Settlement of Indonesian Forestry Companies - Assesing the Role of Banking & Financial Policies for Promoting Sustainable Forest Management in Indonesia (2007)
15 June 2007
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This book is organized into six chapters. Following the introduction chapter, Chapter Two looks into opportunities for using banking and financial policies associated with the Indonesian government’s banking restructuring program to support forestry sector reform. It discusses specific links between the debt restructuring policy under IBRA control and the Ministry of Forestry’s forest industry restructuring policy. It also discusses forestry assets under IBRA management and what it could have done about them. Chapter Three discusses the policy framework surrounding IBRA, the Ministry of Forestry and the international donor community and guides readers through how the Indonesian government implemented the policy and how it was monitored by the international donor community. Chapter Four reviews IBRA forestry company debt resolution policies and practices. Chapter Five discusses the debt settlements of several major forestry debtors including the Sinar Mas, Bob Hasan, Raja Garuda Mas, Djajanti and Barito groups. Finally, Chapter Six provides conclusions and highlights the implications of IBRA debt policy on the forestry, banking and fiscal sectors and closes with some policy recommendations. Towards Wellbeing in Forest Communities - A Source Book for Local Government (2007)
15 June 2007
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This source book offers four tools that local governments can use to better understand local poverty conditions and to plan and monitor actions for reducing poverty. While many tools exist at the national and international levels, local governments need approaches that they can adapt to their own circumstances. The tools in this source book draw on broad experiences in community planning and poverty monitoring in rural areas. They have been adapted to the forest context of our sites and should help to improve communication between local communities and local government to enable decision makers to adjust interventions to local needs, preferences and conditions. The tools are: • Monitoring local poverty through interactive mapping • Monitoring household wellbeing through surveys based on local indicators • Evaluating local government programmes through community focus groups • Communicating communities’ needs through scenario based planning. Forest Rehabilitation in Indonesia - Where to After More than Three Decades? (2007)
15 June 2007
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The study aimed to increase the chances of success of future rehabilitation projects by identifying the approaches that have contributed to longer-term sustainability under different scenarios and have had minimal negative impacts on the different stakeholders. Specific objectives of the study were: 1. To obtain strategic lessons on driving forces, impacts and underlying constraints from past and ongoing rehabilitation initiatives and research 2. To identify the most promising rehabilitation approaches under different ecological and socio-economic scenarios, and 3. To identify appropriate economic and institutional incentives under different conditions. Decentralization of Forest Administration in Indonesia, Implications for Forest Sustainability Economic Development and Community Livelihoods (2006)
15 July 2006
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This study examines the process of forestry sector decentralization that has occurred in post-Soeharto Indonesia, and assesses the implications of more recent efforts by the national government to recentralize administrative authority over forest resources. It aims to describe the dynamics of decentralization in the forestry sector, particularly during the period 1999-2002, and to document major changes that occurred as district governments assumed a greater role in administering forest resources. It examines the preliminary effects of decentralized forest administration, and of more recent steps towards recentralization, in several important areas including: fiscal revenue flows; timber production and marketing; and forest tenure and local livelihood security. Ultimately, the study aims to assess what the ongoing struggle among Indonesia’s national, provincial, and district governments is likely to mean for forest sustainability, rural livelihoods, and economic development at multiple levels. District Governments and Poverty Alleviation in Forest Areas in Indonesia (Governance Brief) (2006)
15 March 2006
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Summary : District governments in Indonesia are in the early stages of trying to reduce poverty in their areas. We explain the influences on district officials’ ability to effectively address poverty in two forest districts based on observations between 2003 and 2005. We found that centrally-imposed programs have created bureaucratic requirements that officials are reluctant to meet or prefer to use to their own benefit. District initiatives for economic development rarely reach the poor and even increase their vulnerability. This poor performance can be explained by weak incentives and institutions, unclear strategies and information and little participation of the poor themselves. District, provincial and central authorities need to ensure benefits for district officials who work to reduce poverty, have coherent, simple strategies, enable poor communities to voice their needs, revitalize coordination with funding and stronger leadership, and enable monitoring by districts and communities of government programs impacts on poverty. Why are Forest Areas Relevant to Reducing Poverty in Indonesia? (2004)
15 December 2004
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    Bappenas (Badan Perencanaan Pembangunan Nasional) and KPK (Komite Penanggulangan Kemiskinan) officials are currently consulting a wide range of organizations, including those concerned with forests, to revise Indonesia’s interim poverty strategy and prepare the nation’s Medium Term Plan (Rencana Jangka Menengah), which is expected to have a strong poverty emphasis. The revised Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) is expected to be completed by January 2005 and the Medium Term Plan will go before the national assembly in January 2005. In this brief, the authors provide information to support this process in its effort to understand and reduce poverty in forests.

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Documents by Subject


Payment Distribution
Deforestation and Degradation
Forest Management in Indonesia
Land Tenure
Carbon Accounting
Indonesia Actions
Governance Assesstment
Financing Options
Opportunity Cost
Regulation on REDD in Indonesia
Carbon Market
REDD Demonstration Sites
Indigenous People
UNFCCC Policy on Forest Emission
Remote Survey

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Payment Distribution
Deforestation and Degradation
Forest Management in Indonesia
Land Tenure
Carbon Accounting
Indonesia Actions
Governance Assesstment
Financing Options
Opportunity Cost
Regulation on REDD in Indonesia
Carbon Market
REDD Demonstration Sites
Indigenous People
UNFCCC Policy on Forest Emission
Remote Survey