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Governance Assesstment


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Testing The Law - Carbon, Crime and Impunity in Indonesia's Plantation Sector (2012)
15 July 2012
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The purpose of the dossier was to provide the authorities with sufficient evidence to prompt a criminal investigation, while notifying the Government of Indonesia (GoI) that EIA/Telapak would make public its response to evidence of clear-cut crime. This briefing outlines the evidence gathered by EIA/Telapak during an investigation into the activities of PT SCP – much of which was detailed in the dossier – and the response of the authorities to the dossier. It illustrates the involvement of regency officials in facilitating illegal forest conversion, and of officials at other levels of government in recognising that crimes had been committed but failing to act decisively. Corruption and REDD+ - Identifying Risks Amid Complexity (2012)
15 May 2012
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Corruption and other factors can influence deforestation in contradictory ways. For the purpose of country-level implementation of REDD+, donors should focus particularly on three corruption risk areas: land grabbing and tenure rights, fraud in monitoring, evaluation and reporting, and elite capture of REDD+ revenues. SVLK - A Pathway toward REDD+(2012)
15 April 2012
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There are pathways that lead to Reducing Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+). One of which is Timber Legal Verification System (SVLK), or it can be put in short “timber certification”. And this book will demonstrate how far SVLK can play its role as a pathway toward REDD+. Generally, this book depicts outputs of studies which were conducted from March to July 2011 by the Centre for Agricultural and Rural Development (PSP3) of Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB) with the support of Multistakeholder Forestry Programme (MFP) II, at the light of strategic frameworks in preparing SVLK as infrastructure of REDD+. SVLK gives a hope to slow down deforestation and forest degradation. And in return, forest with good governance will provide a means to withhold natural carbon stocks and to slow down greenhouse gases which trigger climate change and natural disasters. Draft of PGA's Framework, Structure and Flow of Indicator Measurement on REDD+ Implementation in Indonesia (2012)
15 February 2012
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Preventing The Risk of Corruption in REDD+ in Indonesia (2011)
15 November 2011
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This paper analyses the risks for corruption in REDD+ readiness activities in Indonesia and the conditions that may influence potential outcomes. REDD+ is a mechanism designed under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to enhance the role of forests in curbing climate change, which include forest conservation and activities that increase carbon stocks. The Government of Indonesia has been introducing policies and regulations, creating coordinating mechanisms and initiating demonstration projects to prepare for REDD+. The REDD+ readiness phase in Indonesia involves significant funding from public and private sources. This paper focuses on the readiness phase because this is the period during which policies, institutions, systems and processes are designed. These will influence the presence or absence of risks and conditions for corruption in subsequent phases. The research relied on analysis of relevant legislation, interviews with agency officials, literature reviews and media reports. As Indonesia stands at the forefront in REDD+ policy reform and institutional design, it is hoped the analysis will also inform other forest-rich tropical countries and the donor community. Tackling Illegal Logging in Ulu Masen, Aceh - Strategy, Action and Future Direction (2011)
15 November 2011
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In this report, the authors provide a case study which describes how government law enforcement agencies, local community organisations and Fauna & Flora International (FFI) collaborated effectively to tackle components of illegal logging in and around the 738,000 ha Ulu Masen ecosystem located in Aceh, Indonesia. This forest area acts as a vital watershed for approximately 300,000 people and is currently being developed as a REDD project because of its critical role in carbon sequestration. Between 2008 and 2009, a community-based intel-information system was established around Ulu Masen. From the 190 forest offences reported to the police and the Aceh Forestry and Plantations Agency, 86 law enforcement operations were conducted. In total, 251 m3 of illegal timber, 26 vehicles, 17 chainsaws and two industrial saws were seized, and three sawmills closed, all of which were used for illegal logging. Furthermore, 138 people suspected for their involvement in illegal logging were arrested. From 45 cases monitored until a known outcome, most (29 cases) -proceeded to court and, of these, approximately half (48.3%) of the defendants received a prison sentence (ranging from 4 months to 4.5 years), with the remainder receiving a verbal warning (41.4%) for a first offence or awaiting a final verdict (10.3%). Cases that did not proceed to court (16 cases) were typically constrained by a lack of evidence. Public Integrity Approaches for the Forest Sector (U4 Workshop Report) (2011)
10 November 2011
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The objectives of the workshop agreed with the host U4 Partner Agencies (Embassy of Norway and UK Climate Change Unit -UKCCU) were to: ·         Provide an overview of recent corruption and anti-corruption efforts in Indonesia; ·         Explore why the forest sector presents particular corruption challenges, with special reference to Indonesian realities; ·         Consider current initiatives for addressing public integrity in the forest sector, with special reference to what donors and domestic actors have so far attempted in Indonesia; ·         Discuss potential avenues for future donor activities that promote public integrity with reference to the Indonesian forest sector, considering both preventative and law-enforcement approaches; ·         Promote donor coordination on addressing corruption in the Indonesian forest sector; ·         Promote effective donor support of domestic efforts to address corruption in the Indonesian forest sector. Redelineation - Last Opportunity to Save Natural Forest & Peatland in Indonesian Pulpwood Plantation Concession (2011)
07 October 2011
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Greenomics presentations explained that Indonesia needed to immediately reposition itself as a pulp and paper producer for four main reasons: First, in response to the continuing boycotts of Indonesia paper products. Second, the strong reactions to various advertisements and reports issued by the Indonesian pulp and paper industry, particularly by APP, which are criticized for being nothing more than “greenwashing”. Third, the continuing PR war involving the Indonesian pulp and paper industry. Fourth, the threat of further boycotts of Indonesian paper products, which needs to be countered by repositioning Indonesia as a pulp and paper producing country. Minister of Forestry Proves Indonesia's Moratorium is Toothless (2011)
27 June 2011
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* The Presidential Instruction on the Moratorium has clearly failed to prevent the conversion of conservation areas and protection forests into production forests, as shown by the issuance of Minister of Forestry Decree No. SK.292/Menhut-II/2011.       * The conversion of forestland as part of the revision of provincial spatial plans does not fall within any of the exceptions to the moratorium. This was obviously ignored by the Minister of Forestry as shown by the issuance of Minister of Forestry Decree No. SK.292/Menhut-II/2011. Thus, it is not unlikely that such conversion efforts will continue, bearing in mind that provincial spatial plans are currently being revised all over Indonesia. *     The revision of the Indicative Moratorium Maps every six months by the Minister of Forestry may be construed as nothing more than an exercise in manipulation if the revision process is employed to hive off blocks of forest from conservation areas and protection forests and convert them into production forest and to non-forestlands. Lessons for REDD+ From Measures to Control Illegal Logging in Indonesia (2011)
15 June 2011
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The working paper is structured as follows. Section 2 discusses the Indonesian context of illegal logging and various measures taken over the years to control it (including FLEGT). Section 3 introduces the REDD+ context and explains its relationship with efforts to combat illegal logging; current REDD+ policies and initiatives in Indonesia are presented in detail in Section 3.1. Section 4 discusses monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) systems focusing on concerns of institutional design issues such as the need for clear standards, independent verification, transparency and the inclusion of safeguards. Section 5 focuses on process issues, including how to ensure ownership and multi-stakeholder engagement in the process. Section 6 explores the degree to which these processes can address fundamental underlying governance issues. Section 7 distils the main crosscutting issues for tackling illegal logging and the implementation of REDD+ in Indonesia, and the working paper ends with a summary of the key messages and recommendations. Indonesia's Forest Morotarium - A Stepping Stone to Better Forest Governance (2011)
15 June 2011
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On 20 May 2011, the government of Indonesia released Presidential Instruction (Inpres) No. 10/2011on ‘The postponement of issuance of new licences and improving governance of primary natural forest and peatland’, as part of Indonesia’s cooperation with the government of the Kingdom of Norway, according to the Letter of Intent (LoI) signed by the two governments on 26 May 2010. The Inpres, which effectively imposes a 2-year moratorium on new forest concession licences, generated widespread public discourse and important policy implications. This paper analyses the significance of the moratorium in the context of improving forest governance in Indonesia. It also aims to help interested observers interpret the concerns expressed by various stakeholder groups. We begin by examining the definitions and terms used in the Inpres and the LoI to highlight the complexity of the issues. Then, in response to the government’s call for feedback, we scrutinise the Indicative Moratorium Map (IMM) that accompanied the Inpres. Our analysis includes a particular focus on the challenges related to peatlands, a carbon-rich ecosystem for which governance is weak. We also attempt to draw a link between the moratorium and emission reductions because the moratorium has the potential to create enabling conditions for climate change mitigation, despite its limited scope and timeframe. Caught REDD Handed - How Indonesia's Logging Moratorium was Criminally Compromised on Day one and Norway will Profit (2011)
15 May 2011
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As the signing of Indonesia’s moratorium on forest conversion captured the attention of the international media on May 19th, it was business as usual in Central Kalimantan. With the spotlight on bureaucrats in Jakarta, Indonesia’s climate crooks continued to ply their trade in the forest. Beyond Carbon - Rights-based Safeguard Principles in Law (2010)
15 October 2010
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The rights-based safeguards contained in this concise report have been adapted from legally binding national and international legal principles. The safeguards here are not invented but are already provided for in existing nationally and internationally applicable legislation. This report once again wishes to articulate these principles to ensure that REDD discussions do not focus only on forests but also on rights issues, governance, justice, and environmental integrity. The safeguards presented in this publication are all based on rights. REDD- Forest Governance and Rural Livelihoods - The Emerging Agenda (2010)
15 August 2010
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The proceedings of the workshop are organised in two sections. In the first section, experiences from incentive-based forest management are examined for their effects on the livelihoods of local communities. In the second section, case studies from the six case study countries provide a snapshot of REDD developments to date and identify design features for REDD that would support benefits for forest communities. An introductory chapter provides a synthesis and overview of the workshop findings. Financial Governance and Indonesia's Reforestation Fund During the Soeharto and Post-Soehato Periods 1989-2009 (2010)
23 June 2010
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To strengthen both the Government of Indonesia's administration of the Reforestation Fund and the management of future REDD+ payment mechanisms by Indonesia and other tropical forest countries, the study offers the following recommendations: Build capacity to manage finances and administer revenues; Strengthen institutions to deal with corruption and fraud; Develop effective systems for financial monitoring, reporting and verification; Revise policies to remove misaligned and perverse incentives; Impose robust due diligence and accountability on recipients of public finance; Promote equitable distribution of benefits and minimize negative impacts on forest communities.

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Documents by Subject


Payment Distribution
Deforestation and Degradation
Forest Management in Indonesia
Land Tenure
Carbon Accounting
Indonesia Actions
Governance Assesstment
Financing Options
Opportunity Cost
Regulation on REDD in Indonesia
Carbon Market
REDD Demonstration Sites
Indigenous People
UNFCCC Policy on Forest Emission
Remote Survey

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Payment Distribution
Deforestation and Degradation
Forest Management in Indonesia
Land Tenure
Carbon Accounting
Indonesia Actions
Governance Assesstment
Financing Options
Opportunity Cost
Regulation on REDD in Indonesia
Carbon Market
REDD Demonstration Sites
Indigenous People
UNFCCC Policy on Forest Emission
Remote Survey