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UNFCCC Policy on Forest Emission

UNFCCC Policy on Forest Emission


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IGES Briefing Note on REDD+ Negotiations - UN Climate Change Conference, Bonn, Germany, 14 to 25 May 2012 (2012)
19 July 2012
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  Recommendations          SBSTA to take stock of ongoing initiatives to strengthen national forest monitoring for REDD+, and to evaluate a conservative approach to monitoring      IPCC to be tasked to develop methodological guidance on: (a) MRV of forest-related emissions and removals, forest carbon stocks and area changes; (b) development of forest REL/RL according to national circumstances; and (c) technical elements for national forest monitoring systems, such as remote sensing consistent with phased approach      Parties to explore innovative funding sources, and to develop and test national REDD+ Registries A Tale of Two Architectures : The Once and Future U.N. Climate Change Regime 1 (2011)
07 March 2011
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Abstract : International agreements vary widely in the latitude that they give participating states. Some take a top-down approach, defining particular policies and measures that parties must undertake. Others adopt a more bottom-up approach, allowing each participating state to define its own commitments unilaterally. In the climate change regime, the Kyoto Protocol reflects a top-down approach. Although it gives states freedom in how they implement their commitments, it does not give them similar flexibility in defining the form, nature and content of their commitments. Going forward, the climate change regime faces a choice: continue down the road blazed by Kyoto, or shift to a more bottom-up architecture, focusing on nationally-defined measures. Although the Copenhagen Accord and Cancun Agreements in theory leave this question open, they embrace a bottom-up approach, allowing countries to make national pledges unilaterally. This bottom-up, incremental approach makes sense politically, in order to provide time for countries to learn from experience and to develop trust in the system. Although it is unlikely, in itself, to produce the necessary level of emissions cuts, it represents a useful step forward, by unblocking an apparently stalemated process and by helping to build a foundation for stronger action in the future. The REDD Safeguards of Cancun (2010)
15 August 2010
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Abstract: Reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation and the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks in developing countries has been recognized as a major climate change mitigation tool. But since deforestation and forest degradation so often accompany extreme poverty, particularly among the indigenous people and forest dependent communities, it has been argued that unless properly safeguarded REDD can further impoverish the lives of the poor besides impinging negatively on biodiversity, food security and on national sovereignty. The Cancun Agreement has now addressed these concerns through well designed safeguards. By making REDD primarily responsible for meeting the basic objectives of Article 2 of the UNFCCC that requires climate change mitigation without harming food security and economic development it has been ensured that the REDD activities that discourage future extension of agriculture over forested lands would have to be accompanied by enhanced agricultural productivity so that the food production is not threatened and economic development moves apace. Further the agreement has emphasized REDD as a voluntary mitigation action by developing countries that can only be undertaken taking into account national legislation and sovereignty. Cancun has laid a sound foundation on which a more comprehensive architecture for REDD that includes a market based mechanism can be built in the coming years. Solutions Through Synergies REDD and Sectoral Approaches (2009)
15 December 2009
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This report constitutes an extremely informative guide to the efforts that UNFCCC negotiators are making toward incentivizing and ensuring developing country emission reductions. Robust nationally appropriate mitigation actions (NAMAs) by all Parties are essential for achieving the widely endorsed goal of climate stabilization at a maximum 2°C global temperature increase. The Forest Dialogue (TFD) Investing in REDD-plus - Executive Summary of The Forests Dialogue Consensus (2009)
15 September 2009
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Between April and September 2009 The Forests Dialogue  held four international dialogues that engaged nearly 100 leaders from forest stakeholder groups across the business, environmental, scientific, Indigenous Peoples’ and forest-based communities. These dialogues produced a consensus on financing for REDD-plus, the key points of the consensus are summarized here. The Forest Dialogue (TFD) Investing in REDD-plus - Consensus on frameworks for the financing and implementation of REDD-plus (2009)
15 September 2009
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These dialogues produced a consensus on financing for REDD-plus, including 26 recommendations which, if taken up, will ensure the integrity of REDD-plus as a mechanism for combating climate change through REDD and the conservation and sustainable management of forests. The 26 recommendations are presented in full.

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Documents by Subject


Payment Distribution
Deforestation and Degradation
Forest Management in Indonesia
Land Tenure
Carbon Accounting
Indonesia Actions
Governance Assesstment
Financing Options
Opportunity Cost
Regulation on REDD in Indonesia
Carbon Market
REDD Demonstration Sites
Indigenous People
UNFCCC Policy on Forest Emission
Remote Survey

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Payment Distribution
Deforestation and Degradation
Forest Management in Indonesia
Land Tenure
Carbon Accounting
Indonesia Actions
Governance Assesstment
Financing Options
Opportunity Cost
Regulation on REDD in Indonesia
Carbon Market
REDD Demonstration Sites
Indigenous People
UNFCCC Policy on Forest Emission
Remote Survey